Thursday, 11 June 2009

Erbalunga

Ever since we did our short tour of Cap Corse last April, I have wanted to come back to Erbalunga and have a proper look around, and today was the day! When I set off this morning, it was a little bit cloudy but as so often happens here, the early morning cloud gave way to glorious sunshine and blue skies.



The village centre in Erbalunga in pedestrianised, so it was a real treat to wander round and not have to pay too much attention to where I was going. I quickly discovered that Erbalunga is my idea of a typical Corsican village, and as such is a hidden gem not to be missed. The first thing I came across was a pretty little ‘place’ where there were some ramshackle old buildings of the shabby chic variety, mixed in with some colourful little restaurants and the odd souvenir shop.



I headed to the right of the church down towards the tower, and was rewarded with some amazing sights. The first was the ruined house next door to the restaurant ‘Le Pirate’ which itself occupies a plum spot on the waterfront. The roof is completely gone but the walls and windows remain giving a pretty snapshot of the sea beyond.



From the edge here I could see the small harbour to the left, and a glimpse of the tower to my right, so this where I headed next. The tower itself is a little bigger than the one at Miomo, but not nearly so well preserved. The village side is almost intact but of course what intrigued me was the ruined side facing the sea. I vaguely attempted to scramble down but as I was wearing my trusty flipflops instead of walking shoes, common sense eventually prevailed and I had to admit defeat.



From the tower I lost my bearings slightly and ended up at someone’s front door, but a quick reverse and I found myself at the little harbour. I was surprised once again to find more caf├ęs and restaurants, and an amazing view of the terrace of the restaurant ‘Le Pirate’ with tiny fishing boats bobbing gently in front. I also discovered an old ‘laverie’ which is now just a water fountain (hopefully!).



I’d parked just in front of the brightly coloured Saint Erasme Church – patron saint of fishermen – and as I wandered back, I thought that I would happily have spent a week in Erbalunga snapping away, and would probably have been able to find something new and photogenic every time I whipped out my camera.



I had been a little bit concerned that I wouldn’t be able to park in the village itself as it is relatively small, but in fact I shouldn’t have worried as there were plenty of roadside spaces, and as I headed north in an unsuccessful attempt to find the convent, there was also a designated parking area at the far end of the village. I’ll know for next time!

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